Gryphon D’or Tearoom October 7th @ 8 pm!

 

It’s going to be awesome – Clairely Now and J Stevens?  Quite the lineup!

 

See you there.

 

 

 

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red roses & stars.

Last night, I went to the Wheel Club.  I’m always super nervous when I’m about to play in front of a bunch of musicians; after all, musicians make the most informed kind of audience.

But it went incredibly well!  I had some Patsy Cline ready to sing, but a quick chat with the violinist revealed that he knew some songs that I recorded on From the Kitchen of Clairelynow.  I sang ‘Red is the Rose’ and ‘The Star of the County Down’, and I was super excited about how well it went over.  It’s a pretty big compliment when someone wants to trade their CD for yours (which happened) and someone gave me their 50/50 ticket so I went home with some Hank Snow as well.  I sold some other copies, and I went home feeling really pleased.

I really love singing, but I don’t really like learning songs that are absolute classics.  A good example of this is ‘Crazy’ by Patsy Cline.  She’s an incredible vocalist, and I love listening to that track, but I feel as though her rendition leaves nothing left to be desired.  What could I possibly add to that song?  Cline had an amazing voice, and an incredible sense of presence.  I have my own voice, and my own stage presence, but it’s not the same;  Cline owns ‘Crazy’ even more than its author, Willie Nelson.  ‘Three Cigarettes on the Ashtray’, for instance, is less iconic.  There’s more space for me to play.

I started singing those traditional songs because I realized (about five years ago) that if I wanted to hear those songs the way I thought they should be played.  Experiencing that amazingly positive feedback really supported my theory that musicians need to play music exactly how they hear in in their heads, and that spending time learning music you don’t want to is sort of an energy suck.

I wonder what I’ll play next week!  Oh, yay.

awesome, but odd!

technical difficulties.

When I was a panelist on a radio show, we were told to never tell the audience when we were having technical difficulties.  “No one cares about your problems,” we were told in training, and I assume that the same applies here.

But I’m going to make this blog post in the hope that someone out there can help me.  I am casting this net far and wide despite the possibility of boring all of the internet forever.

I spent a lot of time this morning messing around with music files.  I’ve decided to rerecord my first album under the name, “In the Kitchen of Clairelynow” so that it sounds more professional.  My last recording had too much feedback, and while the songs were lovely, it needed to be cleaned up a bit.

Flash back to last weekend.  I annoyed my neighbors by recording most of the songs over again (plus a couple of new ones) and waited for some help with the computer aspect of things.  Two thumbs, I have, and many fingers, but my brain sometimes does not compute as quickly with digital media.  So this morning (armed with coffee and a comfortable chair) I edited and mixed down one of my songs.  And then imported into a music player, in the hopes of converting the .wav file into an .mp3.

Terrible things happened.  There was static, there were squelching noises, and my partner complimented me on my ‘new, post-punk’ take on the old album.

So I decided to look at the space upgrades on this site.  I figured, “heck, what did .wav files ever do to become so unpopular?” and I hoped that wordpress would accommodate my desire to avoid squeals and loud pops of sound.

It turns out that yes, wordpress does allow .wav files to be uploaded; once a space upgrade is bought and paid for.  I navigated to that site and lo and behold:

The WordPress.com store is currently disabled. We’ll be back up and running in a bit. Thanks for your patience as we sort this out.

Serenity now.

thrums.

In knitting, there is a technique wherein you can produce an insanely warm mitten by knitting in thrums – loose portions of fingering weight roving at about staple length.  They’re common in the North when fur isn’t available.

I’ve been singing a lot lately, and marveling at the word.  Thrum – doesn’t it sound just exactly like a thumb striking some guitar strings?